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of a book cesspool at george mason university was first discussed. the city was one of the initial founders of the festival and is proud to have been a supporter of the vessel ever since. events have been staged in and around the city of fairfax. the local town hall and our historic stage, and the city of fairfax regional library. for the past two years, our brand-new sure what community center. we are proud. we are proud of the "fall for the book festival." it is now my honor to introduce to you our special guest for you. neil gaiman was born in the united kingdom and now lives near minneapolis. he was born and raised in public libraries. he credits laggards of fostering his love of reading. he began his writing career in england as a journalist. his first book was a durand durand biography that took him three months to write. the second was a biography of douglas adams don't panic. the official hitchhikers guide to the galaxy companion. excuse me. this groundbreaking series sandman-- [applause] >> selected a large number of u.s. awards and 75 issue run. >> is at city hall today and one wo
is from jane and calabasas, california. i'm sorry, first jane in new york city. >> that afternoon. i appreciate you. you raised the question of of only one woman being in the book. you did not answer that question and i would like to revisit it. my concern is that there is only one woman. there are several women inventors. why out of all african american inventors fair, white is there only one -- why is there only one -- and all only one -- and all the ones we did during black history month, okay, joy, thanks. >> the ones that we were able to work fine, -- the ones we were able to find, of course, there could be a book on women inventors. all the other ones we thought were significant and we didn't want to exclude women. so we made sure that we had our women's invention. the woman whose future. >> you are also very involved in education, which is a big effort to get science technology and math and engineering and the like. is this in concert without ever? >> yes, i think that is a fact that all the people that are heroes in this book, they are mathematicians and engineers and, a chem
. with commercial development going on in the city. and last year during the census of 2010 we gained of almost 550 people. which doesn't sound like a lot but with about eight or 9%, the first time augusta grew since the 1970 consensus. there's a lot of positives. we have a downtown area that is revitalizing and is growing businesses and people. young people want to live there and businesses want to locate downtown. there's a lot going for us. >> augusta, maine, was first established in 1629 and/or settled as a town in 1754. the city is not the capital of maine. booktv visited the city with the help of our partner time warner cable to explore the local lyric, and historical atmosphere. >> read a friday, i think you people because of stephen king that people who enjoy reading his books and show people that like reading about the small town try to but i think we also like nonfiction stories about their state. people similar and i think they want to read stories about states that are landlocked. i'm not sure the typical reader, if i would see anything, their people to want a good story, you know? and
kennedy there. the church bells start to chime over the city. on the plane, there are three compartments. the first compartment search the president's staff and kennedy's secretaries are sitting there sobbing. just there jacqueline kennedy is sitting next to her husband but in the center compartment lyndon johnson sitting in the president's share there is an error of great -- we know what he is planning because he is making a list on little note pads on air force one with the heading air force one and he writes on one of them one staff and leadership and has to have a meeting with staff and a meeting with the cabinet immediately and the congressional leadership. we know about incidents that occurred during the flight. in one case just before it took off. lyndon johnson calls robert kennedy. these are two men who have hated each other all their lives. at the time kennedy is having lunch. he had a house in virginia called hickory hill. there is a long green lawn that slopes down. robert kennedy is sitting at a table with robert morgan who is the u.s. attorney for new york and two things ha
. howard first and foremost as a bowdoin upon the city to get beat, was born in maine, went on to the rank of general during the civil war, then became head of the freedman's bureau camus superintendent at west point for some time. was in charge of indian wars in the west for a wild. pundit howard university in washington d.c. as well as lincoln memorial university in tennessee and throughout his life was engaged in those institutions that he is such a large part in forming. i bowdoin commuters and the board of trustees for years and years, served as president at howard and lincoln university at different times in his life was awarded the medal of honor for service in the civil war, really had a distinct whoosh career in lots of different ways. what is pulled here are images of him overtime early on. he's a general by then, but still young. and some older ones, including an interesting woodcut rendition of had reduces hand to simple elements that provides for a grim portrait at the same time. a photograph here of him with chief joseph, who was chief of war and first tribe in the northwest,
what became this city, that is to say, the politics that produced it, and the first congress, the politics that sustained the commitment to a potomac capitol rather than a three-state capitol in the 1890s and the experience of the slaves who built washington. and in different ways these books look at the ways in which slavery distorted and corrupted american politics, and more than politics in america. and in america's great debate, particularly the years -- the decades before the civil war. now, what were the origins of this particular book? now, i kept checking the weather today because, as you probably know, storms, thunderstorms were predicted for approximately this time originally. and i was prepared for this, for thunder out there at this moment, which it isn't cooperating. because i was going to evoke the thunderous voice of daniel webster, which i won't intend to try to imitate. i'm not at open -- when i was writing my underground railroad books i came across a speech he gave to a group of businessmen in syracuse, new york, in central new york state, hot bed of underg
in new york city and other invented journalist named benjamin created the first so-called penny press newspaper sold it for a penny a copy so going way down market trying to reach the broadest possible audience and to do that he needed to fill up with surprising and amazing things every day. fires, news from the police stations, docking of ships, anything like that that he could find her who and he wore himself out trying to fill the paper so he hired the first full-time reporter, a man named george wells near -- wilsner but i'm going to try to do something about that. >> when did journalism become a business? that is the period if you are deserting in the colonial period doesn't sound like it was -- how did it support itself? >> most of those newspapers were created by people who were really in another trade. that is they were printers and in order to keep the print shop dizzy and bring their customers into the shop to pick up their papers so that they could sell some stationary on the side or sell them a book while they were in their they hit upon the idea of the newspaper as a perf
, incumbent in 1996. look at the wonders that produced, as it did in new york city and as it has with barack obama. you can see my book in effect in last week's debate. the first objective test obama has faced. for four years he has been coddles by the media. i guess he faced a tough opponent with hillary clinton but who is she? the wife of an in peach ex-president. that is how she made her name. still she was better than john mccain. and even in the obama hillary debate the questions going to obama were so soft ball saturday night live did a sketch on it with hillary being asked these intricate complicated policy questions and the moderator asking obama if he would like another fellow. that was a fair summary and the stunning thing was not how poorly obama did was the other one. [applause] >> if john mccain had been on the stage, we would be the ones with long faces. it was how magnificent mitt romney was and the first time obama had to face a tough opponent. his whole life he has been as long as you don't make fast moves white people will love you. by his account he was smoking pot and man
development going on in this city and in the census we gained a population of 550 people which doesn't sound like a lot but was 9%. the first time augusta groove since the 1970 census. a lot of positive momentum. we have a downtown area that is revitalizing and growing business to young people who want to live down there and businesses want to locate downtown salon is going for us. >> watch booktv all weekend to see more from our recent visit to agusta, maine. for more information visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> next on booktv education activists jonathan kozol talks about inner-city children he followed since the age of 6 to 18-year-old. he examines the economic and educational obstacles each child has face as they progress through their school system. it is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thanks, tom and thanks as always to my absolutely favorite bookstore in america, politics and prose. i love that books for. [applause] and thanks to each and every one of you for being here. i am particularly glad to the with so many friends t
for the first time, first time in history. but our representatives of four new york city boroughs on the supreme court. there is justice sotomayor from the bronx, justice scalia from queens, justice ginsburg from brooklyn, and justin kagan from manhattan. tragically staten island is unrepresented on the supreme court. but you never know when to might be vacancies and we might address that. there are six products of harvard law school in three parts of yale law school on the supreme court for corporately no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact i think. but those are help interesting facts about the supreme court. but, frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if there's a take away here, i've gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that
disaster as it did nric city and it has with barack obama. you can see in last week's debate, that was the first objective thing obama has. for four years he has been coddled by the media. i mean i guess he faced sort of a tough opponent with hillary and linton but who is she? she is the wife of an impeached ex-president and that is how she made her name. still, she was better than john mccain. and you know in the hillary obama debate, the questions going question's going to obama were so thoughtful saturday night live did a sketch on it with hillary being asked these incredibly intricate, complicated policy questions and then the moderator asking obama if he would like another pillow. [laughter] and that was a fair summary and the stunning thing of last week's debate was and how poorly obama did. he is as good as he ever was. [applause] if john mccain had been on the stage with him, we would be the ones -- [inaudible] that is how magnificent mitt romney was in was the first time obama had to face a tough opponent, the first time. his whole life he has been, as he says, make
that from the book in many ways. >> augusta, maine, was first established by english others in 1629. they were settled as a town in 1754. the city is now the capital of maine. booktv visited the city with the help of our partner, time warner, to explore the historical and literary atmosphere. >> i think people like to read a variety. beaucoup enjoyed reading stephen king's books. and you have people that like reading about small-town maine. readers also like nonfiction stories about people similar to them. you know, they want to read stories about states that are landlocked. so i'm not sure they are typical readers, but i think my same thing, there are people who want a good story. you know? and not a pretentious story. i think you often see people who may be wealthy, but they all wear flannel shirts and they don't show off their wealth. they want people who are true people want stories about simple people who go about their lives. they take from what they know. writers in maine take from what they know. they write about what mars and families and historical things that have happene
it dracula he would agreed the tale of two cities. we both kept our promise and i think he got the better part of the bargain. [laughter] at 13 he handed in his first novel he failed every test he took because he hated the 80 of the test and would not participate with the drilling some of the schools spend half the year how to outwit the test. nothing to do with learning. he went to school in england and ninth grade principal said this boy will never go college. he is not college material. he cannot pass his test. of wonderful headmaster said there is something and this boy. we will not give up on him. he had 12 for 14 kids in his class. he graduated from a wonderful college a few years ago also back in the south bronx serving with the kids he left behind. he wants to be a minister. episcopal priest. he will give a guest sermon this sunday. the things about that boy that were so wonderful, they will never show up in numbers. i don't think thoreau would have done well on the standardized exams. he would purposely picked the wrong answers because he was so stubborn. at least emerson said he
, the best thing for the screen, in 1963. tired of his house in your city he moved. they are vidal finishes bet not -- best novel today. the last pagan emperor, is a subject that is the subject of for fastening chapters. expanding on the first person examples, and memoirs, vidal told the tale through multiple and a raiders, a device that enabled him to use pieces of a voice he developed in his essays. he was better at showing -- that are at telling and showing anyway. and first person narrative is all telling. storytelling. the book came out in 1964 with excellent reviews. it was a surprise bestseller. he returned to edgewater, wrote more essays, more political journalism and it worked in other screenplays before he returned to rome to finish his washington novel. this is simply named washington, d.c. is a family saga about political life from the new deal to the mccarthy era. at bush in early 1957, it was a step backwards, a surprisingly clunky novel written mostly in expository dialogue. there's a promising subplot in the homoerotic bond between a newspaper publisher, a young politician,
was the chief of the urban populist movement in chicago where it was first tested to see if he could couple the interest of the dirt farmers with the immigrants and the factory workers in the city. and so he ran for congress once and was defeated. he was offered the nomination for mayor of chicago and turned it down and was offered the nomination for governor of illinois entered the town. in 1904 when william randolph hearst ran for president, darrow tried to do what william jennings bryan had done, which is seize the presidential nomination with a single speech. he was supposed to nominate first for the presidency. he wrote this amazing speech. he gave it as -- at midnight one night at the democratic national convention. all the reporters just loved it. it did move the gallery bill wait -- it did not move the gallery the way that bryant had, the magic just was not there. the goal democrats, the wall street democrats to come back and seize the party and controlled the floor. so it was a trick that darrow tried. he could not pull it off. it was one of the reasons why he hated bryan ellis lif
of what was his first election. we continue to get materials from his office in the law firm in new york city, and it's still getting awards and generating material for his career and so they come to rest over time. in 1990 having just been elected the senate majority leader, mitchell was involved in the 1990 amendments to the act and this is a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we paid $4 a gallon for gas in the sense that it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make for cleaner air. in a sample of his writing style. there are researchers to come because they're interested in particular topics but there's also people that come because the interested in particular techniques or approaches. some people are interested in the newspapers because of the negotiation for instance. and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the records that we have and o
in the city where i was visiting mark. it was quite a violent incident according to the early reports and by then it was an hour to after we had heard the first sirens. there were choppers flying around and six or seven different police agencies were converging with the huge and rapidly escalating manhunt. mark turned to me and said this sounds like your kind of story. he was sort of half joking but when joshua trees are involved i'm usually right there. even though i do break for sand and the desert is often the main character i don't respond to every siren i hear and i don't do that kind of reporting even though the story "desert reckoning" and ironically enough. i guess i have with this book. which took eight years by the way. at any rate we started watching the coverage as it unfolded that afternoon and it turned out that the two main characters involved were very compelling to me. there was a dedicated hermit donald cook who was a suspect in the shooting and he had fled after ambushing the sheriff and it turned out that he was a doctor too little figure with an assault rifle and
-election although it was really his first election. we continue to get materials from senator mitchell's office. he now has a law firm in new york city and is still getting awards and generating material through his career. so these things come to us over time. in 1990, having just been elected to the senate majority leader mitchell was involved in 1990 in the clean air act in this was a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we pay $4 a gallon for gas. it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make cleaner air. and then a sample of mitchell's writing style. there are their researchers to come because they are interested in particular topics but there are also people who come because they are interested in particular techniques or purchase. some people are interested in mitchell's papers because of his negotiating skills for instance and so this is a research question that bridges
the sentimental power of this novel that lasts very much to the present day. >> it augusta maine was first established by english settlers from the plymouth colony in 1629 and was settled as a town in 1754. the city is now the capitol of maine. booktv as it did the city with the help of our partner time warner cable to explore the local literary and historical atmosphere. >> people in maine like to read a friday and i think because of people like steven king people who enjoy reading his books, and you have people that like reading about small-town maine but i think maine likes fiction, stories about their state and i think you know they want to read stories about states that are landlocked. i think if i would say anything, there are people who want a good story. you often see people in maine that may be wealthy but they were where flannel shirts and they don't show off their wealth. i think people, if i could say anything about the stories, they want people that are true, not flashy or surely so i can see them relating to this story about a simple people who go about their lives. i think t
case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of california and to spearhead a singular political movement in the state's history which was the rise of the california progressives. the progressives were, by today's definitions, a bit of a hybrid, and they are sometimes also misunderstood. they were importantly not populist. it was not a pop list movement per se. they were largely middle class men, many were -- many ran small businesses. their principal target of their reform efforts was the southern pacific whose political influence they deplored and which kept them -- which shut them out of business. they loathed corruption and vice, they were quite bourgeois and moderate in their ideological politics. they managed to sort of simultaneously deplore two kind of icons of soci
, such as in pyongyang which is a closed city, our recent information. and also those along the border with china. so i would say bombard the place with as much information as possible. and your first question, which is i think the key one, and i imagine joseph engaging and jay will have some comment on this as well. i see no evidence that kim jong-un is prepared to change north korea. his actions about his issue to kill orders, suggest to me is as determined as he dashed to his father and grandfather were to keep the north korean people under his. you know, there have been recent reports that he has a bride, that there was a picture of him with mickey mouse. i think that's all public relations. and the transport historically, especially kim jong-il, have been very good at public relations. speaking to the international media. i doubt that this place at all in north korea. even if north koreans know that kim jong-un has a wife can i do think it would make any difference to them. >> as far as the changes going on, i think i would agree with melanie that they're by and large cosmetic changes. i think the
are in the first stage of engagement, in second stage, backup, third stage, showing up for rallies and marchs, showing up in city council halls. half of democracy's showing up. those of you who are under 30 in this room, you can assail yourself as being a generation that doesn't show up. and you don't show up in part because you've grown up corporate without a fraction of the civic experience of people who were fighting the civil rights battle as students in the south and in other parts of the country, putting earth day on the map for environmental focus in april 1970, 1500 events around the country. and being embroiled in controversy over the vietnam war, student rights on campus, many other issues. those gave students experience. they came back, they talked to students who didn't go out with them, it was of an educational process. they had teach-ins. they didn't look at screens all the time. they didn't have text messages. they didn't have e-mail. they had to face to face each other. and, therefore, you would see at cafeterias arguments and discussion about the major confrontations. it did
, the first lady's great-grandmother who traveled to four cities, she was a sharecropper's daughter born in 1879 and somewhere along the way she decided she did not want anything to do with the farming life and she was one of the first of michele obama's and sisters to set site on chicago in 1908. this is her husband who was a minister who also lived in chicago. this is the first lady's great great grandmother, and she arrived in illinois some time in the 1860s. the first lady describes herself as a south side girl but the family had no idea their roots in illinois go that far back. if you look at mary, you will understand why the family story says she was part cherokee. she obviously has a mixed lineage but i was never able to establish for sure whether that was true. this is the first lady's grandfather, a mislabeled slide, who left south carolina and arrive in chicago around 1931. this is millvinia, the owner of millvinia's brother. this is a photo, this is an amazing coat, there is a nice story behind this one. after the book was published and after an article about the book came out
to the first amendment and the two entered federal walls containing the legislative veto is previously taught at harvard, am i you, hawaii and american never city law schools and a member of the academy and is a graduate of yale university and harvard law school served as a commission officer in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> i also have the distinction of two things. i read and comment on stuart's book. i don't get a medal of honor for that. my name is and the acknowledgement so no one has come after me yet and if you think it is incendiary. second, and also one of the few lawyers and practices in the supreme court who didn't file a brief and the fisher case. okay, so let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative action the university of texas violate the equal protection clause in connection with its undergraduate emission program and did abigail fisher was she injured by what the university of texas did and i want to start by explaining the em
of the family. this is michelle obama's aunt, francesca. and this is stevie mouton johnson, the first lady's great and mother who traveled to about four cities in her 20s. she was a sharecroppers daughter born in 1879 and somewhere along the way she decided she did not want anything to do with the farming life. she was one of the first, michelle obama's ancestors to go to chicago in 1908. this is her husband, phoebe's husbands who was a prominent porter and minister, who also lived in chicago. this is the first lady's great great grandmother. this is phoebe's mother, mary mosby and she arrived in illinois sometime in the 18 60's. the first lady often describes herself as a south side girl but the family had no idea that their roots in illinois extended that far back. if you look at mary mouton, you understand why the family says she was part cherokee. she obviously has a mixed lineage but i never was able to establish for sure whether that was true. and this is the first lady's grandfather, who left south carolina and her. in chicago in around 1931. this is the owner of melvinia's brother
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